a film photoblog

Fallout Shelter – Blast Door

Fallout Shelter — Blast Door. (Fuji Neopan 400. Nikon F100. Noritsu Koki.)

Fallout Shelter — Blast Door. (Fuji Neopan 400. Nikon F100. Noritsu Koki.)

The dark-haired fellow is my father. He’s struggling to open the rather heavy blast door to the fallout shelter. (For background, click here.) Although this shelter can’t take a direct hit from a nuclear weapon, it can withstand quite a lot of shock. The shelter is called a “fallout shelter” because it’s designed to protect those inside from the effects of nuclear winter.

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7 responses

  1. Very interesting. I really didn’t think people built them anymore. I thought it was more of a 50s-60s thing.

    September 12, 2010 at 3:27 AM

  2. I remember these from the late 50’s early 60’s. I was just a kid. You have some amazing B&W shots on your blog. O really like them.

    September 12, 2010 at 3:51 AM

  3. Nick

    I have to say, I find these pictures and the subject quite fascinating. I can’t wait to see some more.

    September 12, 2010 at 1:35 PM

  4. James Gahl

    “blast door” is such a scary name . .

    September 13, 2010 at 2:41 AM

  5. This is great series. Hope there’s more!

    September 15, 2010 at 8:29 PM

  6. aswirly

    Fascinating about you family’s shelter. It looks very strong. How large is it?

    September 16, 2010 at 3:29 PM

    • If you include the basement (where most of the food is stored), it’s like a three-story house in the ground. My guess is it’s at least 2,000 sq. ft. – cramped in places but overall pretty homey.

      September 16, 2010 at 9:29 PM

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